Medical Tourism in India: Affordable, but is it Accessible to All?

Dear Colleagues,

Happy to share a thought provoking author article from one of our young volunteers, Anav Batra, published in TravelBiz Monitor magazine in October 2019 issue. Happy reading!

Anav Batra, Volunteer, Svayam

New Delhi | 04 October 2019

By Anav Batra

The world has celebrated the World Tourism Day on 27th September with much gusto. Different focused activities took place across the world to promote tourism. This year (2019) the Tourism Day got more prominence, as India was chosen as a host country for the official celebrations of United Nations World Tourism Organization’s (UNWTO) World Tourism Day in New Delhi. Also, the nationwide ‘Paryatan Parv 2019’ kicked off on 2 Oct. 2019 (Gandhi Ji’s 150th birth anniversary) will continue till 13th October 2019 with an aim to propagate the message of ‘Dekho Apna Desh’ to encourage people to visit tourist destinations of the country and spread the message of Tourism for All.    

While several events were organized to promote tourism in the country and showcase India as a great tourist destination which it is, one thing that somehow got missed is the crucial part of tourism i.e. medical tourism. Its enormous potentials and ability to contribute to the national GDP and create employment opportunities need to be emphasized.    

India, a global hub for medical tourists, attracts colossal amounts of patients from around the world. In 2017, over 4.95 lakh (495,000) patients had come for treatment in India, while it was 2.34 lakh (234,000) foreign tourists who came for treatment related reasons in the year 2015. With the rise of medical tourists, comes significant revenue for the medical industry.  KJ Alphons, Former Union Minister of State for Culture, and Tourism, while replying to a question in parliament, had also shared that India had generated an estimated revenue of ₹1,77,874 crore in 2017 alone from foreign exchange. The meteoric rise has resulted in India’s medical tourism industry to be worth a staggering $9 billion dollars by 2020, roughly equivalent to 20% of the global market share.

The question here is, why has India become the medical tourism mammoth that it is? India has a rare mix of affordability, effective and superior clinical outcomes, up-to-date facilities, and a large variety of medical services offered to patients. For example, a heart bypass procedure costs a mere $5,200 in India, as compared to the enormous $144,000 that it costs in the USA. For those who are from lesser-developed nations, India provides a tempting choice for patients. It’s cost-effective, reliable, and accurate. India provides patients from all nations with world class medical services, which cannot be found back at home, at price levels that are staggeringly low from the United States of America, and the United Kingdom. To add on, this concept can also be highly beneficial to patients from first-world countries. These patients may be looking for similar treatment care, for a lower cost, and India provides the perfect solution, right?  Despite all the strengths described above, Medical Tourism in India, however, is losing many medical tourists to nationals like Singapore, Malaysia, and Thailand for variety of reasons. If we look at the data of medical tourism inflow, Bangladesh tops the list while other countries include Maldives, Afghanistan, East African nations. There is no significant number from the first world countries.

To read full article…… visit the source link of TraveBiz Monitor here. or to read the article in PDF click here.

About Equal Opportunities

Svayam - Global Centre for Inclusive Environments, is an initiative of Sminu Jindal Charitable Trust based at New Delhi, India and works for promoting dignity for people with reduced mobility. It advocates an enabling and accessible environment for all. Walkability, Urban Mobility, Green & Inclusive mobility, Accessible Transportation system, Accessible Tourism and Accessible Public Infrastructure and accessible Information and Communication Technologies are few areas it works with special focus to make communities more inclusive and liveable. Svayam is also the Permanent Secretariat for TRANSED Series of Conferences (www.transedconferences.com) under the aegis of Transportation Research Board of National Academies, USA. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook at @SvayamIndia and on Instagram as @svayam_india
This entry was posted in Accessibility Guidelines, Accessibility in public infrastructure, Accessible Cities, Accessible Healthcare, Accessible Hospitals, Accessible India Campaign, Accessible Toilets, Accessible Tourism, Accessible Tourism, Accessible Transport, accessible travel and tourism, Inclusive Tourism, Medical Tourism, Sminu Jindal, Svayam, Svayam India. Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Medical Tourism in India: Affordable, but is it Accessible to All?

  1. Great information about Medical Tourism India. Thanks for sharing information .. keep posting… we are at Medical Tourism in India with Healing Touristry. Click https://www.healingtouristry.com/

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